Leatherworking 1012019-01-03T19:51:46+00:00

Project Description

Leatherworking 101

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Leatherworking 101

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Make your own beautiful leather document case.

Leather was one of the most common protective materials known to man before the invention of plastics. Its beauty, smell, sound, and feel still make it a delightfully sophisticated material choice.  Leather document cases were one way of keeping various papers collected while traveling, but also protected documents from harmful elements.

  • Make a slightly-enlarged copy of a unique leather document case in the collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society.

  • Learn basic leatherworking, hand-sewing, and simple decorative skills.

  • Take home a useful accessory.  Makes a great gift!

Instructor: Brett Walker

Class Length:  One day

Date: Saturday, July 13: 9am — 5pm

No. of Students:  Minimum 4, Maximum 8

Tools: Provided, but students are welcome to bring their own for use with instructor approval.

Description: In this class, students will make a slightly-enlarged copy (to accommodate standard modern letter-size paper) of a unique leather document case in the collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society.  Made in the 1740s by a shoemaker named Samuel Lane, it carried many of his important papers as he traveled regularly from his hometown of Stratham to the coastal city of Portsmouth.  Students will learn basic leather working, hand-sewing, and simple decorative skills, which can be utilized in various other ways, including more advanced classes with Mr. Walker.

Leatherworking 101

Class fee: $175 Materials: $55

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